3-1-collaborating-stranger-or-collaborator.md 1.5 KB
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layout: default
title: 3.1 Collaborating on GitLab
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parent: Tutorials
grand_parent: Git and GitLab
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# Are you a stranger or a known collaborator?
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Two ways to contribute to a GitLab repository, depending on whether you are already known to and trusted by the repository owner
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## Assuming you are a "stranger" to the repository owner

In my experience, a contribution to a repository doesn't come out of nowhere. Often you will have been having a bit of a chat in someone's repository issues (more on that later), and they will say, "Hey, that's a great idea! Do you want to submit a merge request?!". This is your invitation to contribute!

By "stranger" I mean that you are not one of the people who have access to make changes to the repository without going through a gate keeper. Your gate keeper is the process of the pull request which is review by the repository owner.



## If you know the repository owner

You can also submit changes in a more straight forward way if you have ben added as a collaborator to a repository. This requires the repository owner to have agreed this with you in advance, which we're not going to assume has happened here. You can follow a detailed presentation on [how to add collaborators to your repository here](https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1VasZl8YsYMfhi1zYaYZ-kWykjp4T-ZqE5YrOImsC_Kg/edit#slide=id.g1568089626_6_46)


Coming soon
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**This documentation needs to be updated for GitLab**